It’s Better than It Looks: Reasons for Optimism in an Age of Fear

Event Details

It’s Better than It Looks: Reasons for Optimism in an Age of Fear

Time: February 20, 2018 from 6pm to 7:30pm
Location: Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Street: 170 E. 64th Street
City/Town: New York
Website or Map: https://www.carnegiecouncil.o…
Event Type: public, affairs
Organized By: Carnegie Council
Latest Activity: Jan 17

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Event Description

The modern world is facing a series of deeply troubling, even existential problems: fascism, terrorism, environmental collapse, racial and economic inequality, and more. However, in this age of discord and fear-mongering, we forget that by almost every meaningful measure, the modern world is better than it ever has been. Worldwide, malnutrition and extreme poverty are at historic lows, and the risk of dying by war or violence is the lowest in human history.

Has the rise of social media blurred our perspectives on the world? Is civilization teetering on the edge of a cliff, or are we just climbing higher than ever?

Gregg Easterbrook is a contributing editor to The New Republic and The Atlantic Monthly and he writes the Tuesday Morning Quarterback column for The New York Times. He was previously a fellow at the Brookings Institution and at the Fulbright Foundation.

Image: Detail from book cover.

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